Reviews & book promotion

I am pleased to say the Historical Novel Society review of my novel Sharavogue has now been posted. I am glad to see it after several months of waiting. HNS reviewers can be tough, and do not hold punches if they don’t like something, so overall this seems to be a positive review.

HNSLondon14-220By the way, HNS has a conference in London first week of September. I won’t be able to attend but I am sure it will be a great event.

It is wonderful, of course, to see “nicely written” in the first line of the review. The reviewer goes on to summarize the story, and notes that it moves along at a quick pace, “sometimes too quick.” This may be true, I did intend to maintain a momentum, and most of my readers say “I couldn’t put it down” — which is a good thing.

A few other comments about timing and events I believe are subjective, but well taken as I work on the story for the prequel.

So what next? How can I maximize this review? I have shared it on social media. I am one who avoided all but Facebook for a long time because it consumes time that I would rather use in other ways. But it is hard to argue with the reach, if I have no data to actually recognize results in terms of sales. Last week I received a reader review on Amazon. I shared it on FB, and where usually I might get between 15 and 85 views, this one was reshared and drew more than 300 views and several very favorable comments. That was certainly worth the time invested.

My goal as an author is not to sell millions of books, just to sell at least enough to break even and support the next one. But there is no getting around the fact that promotion is hard work, requires constant maintenance, and is at least as much if not more time consuming than writing the actual novel — and far less rewarding!

In a very interesting post, author Eileen Goudge explains why she left her traditional publisher to pursue self publishing. Initially I felt bad for her because it would mean she would have to take on all the promotional work independent writers and publishers have to handle themselves. But Goudge dispels the myth that traditional publishers offer a marketing budget for your book. Apparently authors are on their own anyway, and then are discarded if their book sales are not stellar. Perhaps she is better off not having to play the game of traditional publishers. I wish her great success!

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Reviews & book promotion

  1. Best of luck to you. Getting a novel written so there’s a beginning and middle and end is an enormous challenge, and very stimulating on every level when you’re plowed in. And making it a good story most of all. I’m glad you’re getting praise, so lovely. The emotional high and anxiety at the end really deserves huge parties and celebration, champagne bottles popping corks, strangers coming to your door for autographs, unbelievable feasts, and impossibly long lists of interview demands. Regrettably, the author is frequently left in a disturbing silence, peeking at the horizon for fireworks that don’t come, and (on the same day100 or 1000 copies are sold) heating up leftovers from a still empty refrigerator and your plate and fork alone on the table. So the shift is made to self-congratulations, pride of accomplishment, and entertaining the plot of the next book. Writing is a solitary profession, maybe the greatest reward being the burgeoning understanding of ourselves, hoping it does something like that for the reader.
    Congratulations on your new book. Hoorah!!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s